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50% of Ukrainians Believe That Owners Should Have the Right to Sell Their Land Plots

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These results were made public after a nationwide poll by the Ilko Kucheriv Democratic Initiatives Foundation jointly with the Razumkov Centre Sociological Service from June 13 to 20, 2019 in all regions of Ukraine, except the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the occupied territories of Donetsk and Luhansk Regions. 2017 respondents from the age of 18 years onwards were interviewed. The theoretical sample error does not exceed 2.3%.

The results of the survey were presented by the Director of the Foundation and a member of the RPR Coalition Board Iryna Bekeshkina in Ukrinform on September 10: “The first question: “Do you think that a person who owns a land plot should have the right to sell it?” 50.4% said yes. It should be allowed to sell, a person should have this right.”  

In the West of Ukraine, 62% of respondents opted for the land owner’s right to sell it, 14% of respondents were against it; in Donbas (not occupied territory – ed.) for – 44%, against – 43%; in the Center: for – 47.2%, against – 33%; in the South: for – 34% while 36% oppose land sales.

She also said that 28.1% of respondents do not think that the landowner should have the right to sell it, and 21.5% do not have a definite opinion on this issue.

A survey by the Democratic Initiatives Foundation also shows how Ukrainians’ views have changed regarding the introduction of the land market.

“While in December 2011, half of the population (50.8% – ed.) believed that land could not be sold in general, now this figure dropped to 33.2%,” said the expert.

Today, 22.1% of respondents believe that land can only be sold to Ukrainian residents (in 2011 – 14.7%); 12.4% are in favor of the restriction of the area of the land plot which is sold to one person or company (in 2011 – 10.4%); 10.8% are for introducing a price ceiling below which land cannot be sold (in 2011 – 8.9%); 8.1% of respondents believe that land should be sold without any restrictions (in 2011 – 4%).

Of those surveyed who own land, 56% are convinced that the landowner should be allowed to sell it, 33% are of the opposite opinion. Among those who have no land, 46% support the right to sell and 28% oppose it. Among the city residents, the right to sell land is supported by 51% of respondents, while 27% of respondents oppose it; among rural residents – 46% are in favor of land sales, 35% are against.

The study also found that if the moratorium on the sale of agricultural land were lifted, 47.8% of land owners would do nothing with the land (55.9% of respondents in this category expressed this opinion in 2011), 6.7% were planning to sell the land plot or part thereof (10.4% in 2011), 3.9% wanted to purchase land (5.5% in 2011); 11.1% would leave the land for cultivation with the same lessee (in 2011 – 12.8%); 2.5% were planning to change the lessee (in 2011 – 1.1%).

For comparison, data from a nationwide poll of Ukraine’s population conducted by the Democratic Initiatives Foundation and Ukraine Sociology Service in December 2011 are cited. Back then, 2012 respondents from the age of 18 years onwards were interviewed.

These results were made public after a nationwide poll by the Ilko Kucheriv Democratic Initiatives Foundation jointly with the Razumkov Centre Sociological Service from June 13 to 20, 2019 in all regions of Ukraine, except the Autonomous Republic of Crimea and the occupied territories of Donetsk and Luhansk Regions. 2017 respondents from the age of 18 years onwards were interviewed. The theoretical sample error does not exceed 2.3%.

The results of the survey were presented by the Director of the Foundation and a member of the RPR Coalition Board Iryna Bekeshkina in Ukrinform on September 10: “The first question: “Do you think that a person who owns a land plot should have the right to sell it?” 50.4% said yes. It should be allowed to sell, a person should have this right.”  

In the West of Ukraine, 62% of respondents opted for the land owner’s right to sell it, 14% of respondents were against it; in Donbas (not occupied territory – ed.) for – 44%, against – 43%; in the Center: for – 47.2%, against – 33%; in the South: for – 34% while 36% oppose land sales.

She also said that 28.1% of respondents do not think that the landowner should have the right to sell it, and 21.5% do not have a definite opinion on this issue.

A survey by the Democratic Initiatives Foundation also shows how Ukrainians’ views have changed regarding the introduction of the land market.

“While in December 2011, half of the population (50.8% – ed.) believed that land could not be sold in general, now this figure dropped to 33.2%,” said the expert.

Today, 22.1% of respondents believe that land can only be sold to Ukrainian residents (in 2011 – 14.7%); 12.4% are in favor of the restriction of the area of the land plot which is sold to one person or company (in 2011 – 10.4%); 10.8% are for introducing a price ceiling below which land cannot be sold (in 2011 – 8.9%); 8.1% of respondents believe that land should be sold without any restrictions (in 2011 – 4%).

Of those surveyed who own land, 56% are convinced that the landowner should be allowed to sell it, 33% are of the opposite opinion. Among those who have no land, 46% support the right to sell and 28% oppose it. Among the city residents, the right to sell land is supported by 51% of respondents, while 27% of respondents oppose it; among rural residents – 46% are in favor of land sales, 35% are against.

The study also found that if the moratorium on the sale of agricultural land were lifted, 47.8% of land owners would do nothing with the land (55.9% of respondents in this category expressed this opinion in 2011), 6.7% were planning to sell the land plot or part thereof (10.4% in 2011), 3.9% wanted to purchase land (5.5% in 2011); 11.1% would leave the land for cultivation with the same lessee (in 2011 – 12.8%); 2.5% were planning to change the lessee (in 2011 – 1.1%).

For comparison, data from a nationwide poll of Ukraine’s population conducted by the Democratic Initiatives Foundation and Ukraine Sociology Service in December 2011 are cited. Back then, 2012 respondents from the age of 18 years onwards were interviewed.

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